piglit (V): how to contribute to piglit and table of contents

Last post and the one before were about how to create your own piglit tests. Previously, I have written an introduction to piglit and how to launch a tailored piglit run (more details about these last two topics in my FOSDEM 2015 talk).

Now it’s time to talk about how to contribute to piglit.

How to contribute to piglit

Once you want to contribute something to piglit, you need to generate the patches and send them for review to the mailing list. They are usually created by git format-patch and sent by git send-email command (if you need help with git, there are a lot of tutorials). Remember to rebase your branch against up-to-dated master before creating the patches, so no merge conflicts will appear if the reviewers wants to apply them locally.

Whether you have some patches ready to be submitted or you have questions about piglit, subscribe to piglit@lists.freedesktop.org and send them there.

Most piglit developers work in other areas (such as OpenGL driver development!) which means that the review process of piglit patches could take some time, so be patient and wait.

If after some time (something like one or two weeks) there is no answer about your patches, you can send a reminder saying that a review is pending. If you have commit rights and the patch is trivial (or you are very confident that it is right), you can even push it to the repository’s master branch after that time. Piglit is not as strict as other projects in this regard, however do not abuse of this rule.

Once you have a good track of contributions or other contributors told you to do so, you can ask for piglit repository’s commit rights by following these instructions. And don’t hesitate to review patches from others!

Table of contents

This is the list of my piglit related posts:

  1. Piglit, an open-source test suite for OpenGL implementations
  2. piglit (II): How to launch a tailored piglit run
  3. piglit (III): How to write GLSL shader tests
  4. piglit (IV): How to write binary test programs
  5. piglit (V): how to contribute to piglit and table of contents

Plus my FOSDEM 2015 talk.

Thanks for following this short introduction to piglit. Happy hacking!

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